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Issue 44 Inspiration Journal, July - September 2010 Cover

Leap of Faith
Char’s Message

A few months ago, I found myself climbing up a forty-foot pine tree, from which I was to jump onto five small swinging platforms, crossing to get to the last one, and then gently scoot off the edge and land on the ground. Well, it took me forever to leave the safety of the platform. It was the most precarious physical situation I’ve ever put myself in, and by far the scariest. Of course, I wore a helmet and was harnessed to a very strong man below and I saw several others finish unharmed, but all of this logic and reasoning didn’t stop my fears from engulfing my whole body. It was really high up!

After a very, very long time, I finally let go and went down. The best (or most embarrassing) part was realizing instantly after leaving my safety net that it was a breeze. These high ropes, called the “Leap of Faith,” have an uncanny way of putting your deepest fears right in your face, which is a great way to know yourself better. Okay, so I know I have a fear of jumping off high places, but when I do it’s always fun at the bottom. So once again, it’s clear that “letting go” is a good thing.

That proved to be a prophetic experience, as I find myself again taking a leap of faith at beginning Inspiration’s eighth year. After thoughtful deliberation, we have decided to transition into a quarterly publication starting with this Summer Issue to be followed by the Fall, Winter and Spring Issues. This change is to allow us time to grow between each issue and Inspiration’s amazing TV show. We’ve just completed our first successful season with 13 episodes featuring health and wellness activities throughout Kaua`i. Soon we’ll be shooting season two and the line-up is exciting. One of our long-term goals is to take the show on a road trip to feature heartfelt practitioners and awesome healthy activities throughout the state and abroad. In order to do it right, in Inspiration style, we look forward to broadening our scope to cover new fascinating topics, complement the TV show and continue to empower you on your wellness path. With the support of Inspiration’s crew, I have faith that this transition is the natural evolution for the journal.

This issue offers an eclectic collection of inspirational and educational articles for your mind, body and spirit. In “Born Leaders,” Mason Chock explores whether leaders are born or must be trained. A gifted teacher and visionary, he created Kaua`i Team Challenge, and the outrageous ropes course where I stood up on the forty-foot platform overlooking beautiful Hanalei Bay. (You can watch this thrilling Episode #12 online at http://www.OC16.tv/shows/67.)

In other articles, personal trainers Terri Hunter and Jeff Nelson use their expertise to highlight important keys for successful workouts, essential to our health. Sara Wiseman and Master Ryuho Okawa encourage us to awaken and develop our spiritual awareness, important for our well-being.

Go ahead, learn to get out of your own way and take a leap… you’ll like it!

Enjoy your summer,
Char


Born Leaders by Mason Chock

Are leaders born? Do great leaders come into this world with a natural ability to affect greater advancements for humanity? Are they gifted with the talent to empower others around them as they themselves are lifted through their successes? Life stories and biographies of great leaders such as Mahatma Gandhi, Nelsen Mandela, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Teresa and many, many more remind us how leaders become who they are. It is through commitment to developing socially, emotionally and intellectually through life’s experiences that leaders solidify their ability to affect huge change.

Coming to Our Senses! Activating Your True Potential by Dr. Jane Ely

We have the capacity to accept other realities-to respond to dreams, visions, ideas, creativity and spiritual teachings. The non-material world is an exploration into the unknown. We are part of the unknown, also termed non-ordinary reality. It is available to us when we are open, connected and in a relaxed state of conscious awareness. Transformation is an inside job, as is the capacity to reach our true potential. We do this by developing spiritual capacities through engaging in meditation, prayer, awe, wonderment, and miracles.

Fueling Up! Pre & Post Exercise Nutrition for the Young Athlete by Jeff Nelson, CPT

Research shows that much of our hard work in a training session can be negated by improper nutrition, especially in the pre- and post-workout phases. As a personal trainer and soccer coach, one of the frequent questions I hear is a variation of “How can I best prepare my child for their training with proper nutrition?” Much has been written about nutrition and it is a huge topic with many variables, so this article will narrow the focus to pre- and post-workout.

Overall Nutrition

The body requires a proper combination of carbohydrates, protein, fat, fiber, vitamins and minerals to perform at its peak and achieve the athlete’s performance demands. A proper average ratio of the macronutrients would be 50 – 70% carbohydrates, 15 – 30% protein and 10 – 30% fats.

Run for your Life!

Helpful tips to properly train for a marathon and a lifetime. by Terri Hunter, CPT

Whether you’re running to train for a full or half marathon, keep in mind that you should be training properly to prevent injury and burnout. This will create a positive and enjoyable experience, not just for today, but for a lifetime! The 2nd annual Kaua`i Marathon is on September 5, 2010. A full marathon is 26.2 miles and a half marathon is 13.1 miles. You can run, run/walk or walk the whole marathon. Yes, the Kaua`i Marathon is walker friendly, just as long as you pass the 6.5 mile mark in 1 hour 45 minutes. Go towww.thekauaimarathon.com for more information. Please note that this article focuses on running the marathon. I ran the Kaua`i half marathon last year and it was a great experience. I followed a training schedule and completed the half marathon feeling good and injury free. I am looking forward to running the Kaua`i half marathon again this year.

Eating Smart – Honoring Traditions by Francesco Garri Garripoli

One of the gifts of living or vacationing in Hawai`i is that we get the opportunity to immerse ourselves in a wonderfully diverse cultural experience. Our islands reflect the core Polynesian roots of the people who first came to call this their home. I think about the brave travelers who came here in canoes from islands we know now as Tahiti, Marqueses and others. They navigated by the stars and could only carry minimal supplies over the long journey in their small boats, bringing the food they would need for their long seafaring trip, along with seeds, roots and cuttings so that they could ensure they would have food in their new home.

Other articles:

  • Makai Ola Integrative Health Center
  • BROCK TULLY: Pedaling for Kindness by Pamela Salibi
  • Practicing Ahimsa with YogAlign By Erin Wascher.
  • Discovering the Amazing Power of Meridian Tapping by Kirstin Morris, LMT
  • You Can Rise You Can Shine by Master Ryuho Okawa
  • Receiving Divine Guidance is easier than you think by Sara Wiseman
  • YOU: A Channel for the Cosmos by Adriana Attento-McKnight
  • Come Home by Ruey Ryburn, DrPH, RN, AHN-BC
  • Vegan Fusion: Daikon Carrot Salad by Chef Mark Reinfeld
  • BIO-SYNERGETIC DENTISTRY by Dr. Ronald Carlson, DDS

Born Leaders by Mason Chock

Are leaders born? Do great leaders come into this world with a natural ability to affect greater advancements for humanity? Are they gifted with the talent to empower others around them as they themselves are lifted through their successes? Life stories and biographies of great leaders such as Mahatma Gandhi, Nelsen Mandela, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Teresa and many, many more remind us how leaders become who they are. It is through commitment to developing socially, emotionally and intellectually through life’s experiences that leaders solidify their ability to affect huge change.

Here’s an example of what I’m talking about:

Returning from a recent Honolulu trip, as I sat on the bench fronting the sidewalk of the Lihu`e airport terminal, I noticed a familiar face in an airport security guard uniform. The fact that he was one of those security guards that shoos everyone away from the baggage claim area wasn’t what caught my eye. Rather it was his pleasant smile that gleamed from afar which triggered my attention. I quickly remembered him as one of my fellow haumana (students) who along with me had dedicated time to learning the art of la`au lapa`au (Hawaiian medicinal herbs) through Kumu Levon Ohai’s KCC class. As he approached, he greeted me and asked how I had been. His demeanor was very `oluolu (giving) and ha`aha`a (humble), like a wise older man who had seen the world and now was content with life.

I was excited to ask if he had been practicing la`au lately and I inquired how any of our lessons had affected his life. Within the few minutes that we had to share, he expressed an eloquent story of the depth of who he was. He said, “I am retired, and hold this security job because I need to receive medical coverage for certain procedures. This job is tough,” he went on, “people swear at me, spit on me, give me the bird when I ask them to circle around the airport loop so as to not clog up the traffic and to follow airport security guidelines. The reason I explain this to you has a direct relation to my learning that you ask of. It’s taken my whole life, its challenges and its lessons to shape me into who I am today. If there was anything that I’ve learned from the knowledge gained in la`au class, it is the necessity to cleanse ourselves before expecting to help others. I am so thankful for being able to practice cleansing my body, spirit and mind on a daily basis through prayer, fasting and practicing good health. It makes life so easy to manage and to deal with. The reason I can take the constant abuse that this job offers is because I am sound in mind, body and spirit. It gives me the strength and wherewithal to continue to serve others. Situations that were difficult earlier in my life seem to just roll off of me now. I am much more tolerant and at peace. But I certainly wasn’t born this way – it came with years of hard lessons that ke akua placed before me in order to acknowledge patience, fortitude, integrity and perseverance. ”

I was very touched by his answer. I will certainly not look at airport security the same way again! It made me reflect on many of my life’s lessons and how they’ve shaped who I am. His wisdom reminded me of the characteristics of true leaders and the lessons they endured in order to reach their goals. It helped me to understand that there are some who are naturally talented, gifted to serve and to lead; but there are far more who have spent a lifetime of hard work learning how to become better, thoughtful and effective leaders who are balanced with emotional, intellectual and social intelligence.

As I think about this older man working as an airport security guard, I am reminded of the many great leaders who have proven that leaders aren’t born, they’re made. The great coach of the Minnesota Vikings, Vince Lombardi, once said, “Leaders aren’t born, they are made. And they are made just like anything else, through hard work. And that’s the price we have to pay to achieve that goal, or any goal.” May we always keep in mind our personal responsibility to ourselves in order to serve the world, and always look for ways to learn to become leaders.


Coming to Our Senses! Activating Your True Potential by Dr. Jane Ely

The Twelve Teachings of the Wheel of Life began in January/February 2010, Volume 7, Issue #5. In that article we explored wholeness and change. Each one of these articles expresses concepts from teachings drawn from the Medicine Wheel, the ancient Native American Indian wheel of spiritual evolution which are universal in that they relate to the cycles of all life and the natural, organic world.
The intention of this series is to provide a concept and then follow it with a practice that you can integrate into your daily life and thus into your consciousness.
In this article we explore our capacities-our natural gifts and talents and how we bring them into the world.

Capacities/Potentials
We have the capacity to accept other realities-to respond to dreams, visions, ideas, creativity and spiritual teachings. The non-material world is an exploration into the unknown. We are part of the unknown, also termed non-ordinary reality. It is available to us when we are open, connected and in a relaxed state of conscious awareness. Transformation is an inside job, as is the capacity to reach our true potential. We do this by developing spiritual capacities through engaging in meditation, prayer, awe, wonderment, and miracles. Connecting to the help and support provided to us from the spirit world and from the natural world are all pathways in this journey that open us to greater awareness. The ability to ground spirituality in this reality is the balance we are seeking between the outer physical world and the inner spiritual world.

Capacity is our ability to respond to the call to go inward. Capacity has within it the sense of being flexible and open, of conscious choice based upon Trust, Truth, Discernment and Faith. We need to understand and accept that there are worlds and dimensions beyond our ken [our normal understanding]. In the spirit world there is a sense known as volition. Volition means to take a step into the unknown, to fly, to make a decision to go forward, not knowing the outcome. In this case it means to take the journey of change. When an individual makes the commitment to change, you will be met and aided by the forces of the unseen world-the spirit world. There are guides, teachers, ancestors, mentors-all are allies that appear during times of change, times of risk taking and transformation. These allies appear as both friendly support and as challenge-teachers. An ally provides support and insight along the path. A challenge-teacher may appear as a hard lesson, a contrary person, an event or experience that changes the course of your life. Once you commit to change, the entire unseen world is accessible to you. You have protectors each step of the way both in the physical world and the spiritual world. The only source of failure on a journey is ‘falling asleep’- going back into the trance-state or defensive state [mask] of the past and staying there. This is known as a regression to the past but at any moment you also have the incredible choice to wake up again, to continue the journey of transformation. The ego-mind is no longer in charge when you commit to living your true potential.

Skillful Means:
Reflect upon your allies in the physical world and then upon whom you may call in the spirit worlds for help and support. What are your spiritual beliefs? Who are your allies in both the physical and in the spiritual worlds?

Begin to describe the gifts you have from within your being. Begin with some opening questions: What gifts do I bring to my life and to the world? For example: Am I naturally funny, or naturally compassionate to animals, etc? Look at the natural capacities you bring into life as positive gifts. Natural capacities are gifts we are born with. They may also be spiritual gifts we have brought forward to this time so that we may learn, grow and evolve. Make a list of positive ways you are connecting with your potentials. Make this list as long as you can, go into detail. Do this for several days. This is a list of your potentials. We are ‘taking stock’ in this skillful means practice. All capacities are honored in describing your true potential. Reflect upon the larger world to which you are bringing your gifts or would like to manifest them. Often times we can see how we are giving to our outer world before we sit to reflect upon our inner self. If that is the case, look to the outer world first to see how your potential is being engaged. Also, become aware of potentials that remain unexplored, un-manifested. Pay attention to these capacities.

Once you have completed your list of natural capacities, take some time to be grateful. In out next article we will look at manifestation and engaged participation with our potentials and capacities.

Dr. Jane Ely, bio. www.drjaneely.net. 808-245-4246


Fueling Up! Pre & Post Exercise Nutrition for the Young Athlete by Jeff Nelson, CPT

Research shows that much of our hard work in a training session can be negated by improper nutrition, especially in the pre- and post-workout phases. As a personal trainer and soccer coach, one of the frequent questions I hear is a variation of “How can I best prepare my child for their training with proper nutrition?” Much has been written about nutrition and it is a huge topic with many variables, so this article will narrow the focus to pre- and post-workout.

Overall Nutrition
The body requires a proper combination of carbohydrates, protein, fat, fiber, vitamins and minerals to perform at its peak and achieve the athlete’s performance demands. A proper average ratio of the macronutrients would be 50 – 70% carbohydrates, 15 – 30% protein and 10 – 30% fats.

Breakfast is truly the most important meal of the day – it replenishes the glycogen stores reduced through the “fasting” of overnight sleep (hence the term “break fast”). Glycogen is essentially our body’s fuel and in the morning our glycogen stores are lowered by as much as 80%!

Pre-Workout – Fill the Tank
When you eat before you train, you are able to train at a higher intensity, longer. You want to consume a slightly higher ratio of carbohydrates to build up those glycogen stores, and protein to prepare the body for the post-workout recovery process.

A basic rule of thumb is that the closer you get to your session, the more digestible your meal needs to be. For example at 1 hour grab half a turkey sandwich or other whole food, or at 30 minutes an energy bar, or if inside 30 minutes make a quick shake of orange juice with whey protein. 8 oz and can be water-diluted orange juice as well. Something is definitely better than nothing – eating something before a workout gives you more energy, allows you to train harder and to burn more calories.

Post-Workout Planning – Re-fuel
Eating after you train is the most important element of performance nutrition. Training taxes your energy stores, which dehydrates your body and breaks down your muscle. By eating within 30 – 60 minutes after your session, you shift your body from breakdown into recovery. For youth athletes a rough 2:1 ratio of carbs to protein is good (e.g. 30g carbs and 15g protein), with liquid form preferred because it is easier to digest, and travels to your muscles faster, speeding up the recovery process.

To perform at a high level you also need to make rest a priority. Sleep is the primary time when the body goes into repair and healing mode. Training and performance taxes the mind as well as the body and research again shows that we do not perform as well mentally without appropriate rest.

A proper cool-down is also necessary. It quickens the recovery process and minimizes post-training stress. The cool-down is key to neutralizing the effects of our training and returning our body to its normal state. Proper hydration is absolutely critical to peak performance. In general, I recommend athletes who are in high school or club sport training to target at least a gallon of water a day, especially while in season and peak training. The recommendation for the general population is 96 oz before all the other variables of temperature, humidity, altitude, etc come into play. For youth ages 10 and older, 64 – 96 ounces is pretty good.

Basic recommendations:
Before: 16 oz two hours before exercise
During: match your sweat rate (about 4-6 gulps for every 20 minutes of exercise, or approximately 20 to 40 oz of fluid every hour)
After: 20 oz of fluid for every pound of body weight lost during the session

Summary
Drink plenty of water, get plenty of sleep, eat something before you train and then post-workout get in that cool down and grab your snack or shake to optimize recovery and prepare your body for the next training session, or to feel better when you hit the waves (after all, we are talking about youth and Hawai`i – train to live, not live to train, right?!). To your health… Jeff

BIOGRAPHY
Jeff Nelson is a Certified Personal Trainer and former professional soccer player and collegiate National Goalkeeper of the Year. He is the founder of ASPIRE Functional Training on the island of Kaua`i and utilizes the ADAPT training system to train the human body to perform within its functional design, unlocking the physical potential of the individual to be fully realized. ASPIRE develops and utilizes client-specific functional movement to restore the body to its original blueprint – a durable, pain-free, muscularly efficient machine capable of elite athleticism or just “doing life better.” Jeff@ASPIRE-FiT.com, 503.880.3877, www.ASPIRE-FiT.com

Berning JR, Steen SN. Nutrition for Sport and Exercise. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers, 1998.
Convertine VA, Armstrong LE, Coyle EF, Mack GW, Sawka MN, Senay LC Jr, Sherman WM. ACSM position stand. Exercise and fluid replacement. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1996; 28(1):i-vii.

Contact info:
Jeff Nelson
ASPIRE Functional Training
Jeff@ASPIRE-FiT.com
503.880.3877
www.ASPIRE-FiT.com


Eating Smart – Honoring Traditions by Francesco Garri Garripoli

One of the gifts of living or vacationing in Hawai`i is that we get the opportunity to immerse ourselves in a wonderfully diverse cultural experience. Our islands reflect the core Polynesian roots of the people who first came to call this their home. I think about the brave travelers who came here in canoes from islands we know now as Tahiti, Marqueses and others. They navigated by the stars and could only carry minimal supplies over the long journey in their small boats, bringing the food they would need for their long seafaring trip, along with seeds, roots and cuttings so that they could ensure they would have food in their new home.

Over the centuries, people of many other cultures also came to call these islands their home, each bringing their foods with them, resulting in many cross-cultural blendings, some beneficial, but some not. For instance, consider our local wild pigs. The first pigs brought over in canoes were the small, mountain pigs of the Polynesian islands. They ate roots and coexisted quite well with the inhabitants, providing a great source of lean protein. When Europeans came, they brought a large breed. The pigs, raised in fenced-in farms, were lazy and high in fat. It’s easy to see what happened over the following 200 years of cross-breeding. Our wild pig that lives in the mountains is quite large, aggressive and is harmful to their environment. This is only an example of happens when cultures collide without being conscious of the effects.

When the Chinese and then Japanese cultures found their way to Hawai`i in search of work in the growing sugar cane industry of the 19th century, they brought their own traditional diets. As local Hawaiian workers mixed with Asian workers, white rice started to replace the Polynesian starch staple, taro (steamed or pounded into poi). The Asians were accustomed to eating white rice in combination with lots of vegetables and green tea which contributed to the body’s ability to process it. As the Polynesian diet didn’t include either heavy vegetable or green tea intake, the out-of-context white rice created a major digestive challenge for the local people.

Added to the problem of white rice was refined white flour, which was the European starch staple. White flour – used in everything from macaroni salad, pasta, bread, cakes, etc., was a major blow to the health of the local Polynesians. White rice and flour are carbohydrates that get converted to sugars when they are not metabolized or used properly by the body. Reduced physical exertion and exercise that came with changing lifestyles further contributed to the problem. Add refined sugars from soda pop and candy to this and it spells disaster for the human body and usually plays itself out as arterial inflammation (leading to heart disease) or as diabetes, which indeed have become common.

Globally, people of every culture who have lost touch with their natural instincts, eat more processed foods and exercise less and less are facing the same health risks. When I first moved to O`ahu as a teenager, an old healer took me under his wings and brought me into his hula halau. This was a very traditional halau and everyone ate a traditional Hawaiian diet. We ate fruit, poi, raw fish and cabbage. The kapuna taught me to select baby coconut sprouts and eat the cream inside. This was the start of my understanding of the transformation of food into energy.

Through my experiences of living in China, traveling through Asia, and studying Qigong and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), I have continued to learn about food as a source of Qi (chi) – life force energy. Everything is energy after all, and food, like the air we breathe, is how we take in Qi every day. Eating is a very conscious process in TCM. Because each of us is so unique and beautiful, we each have a diet that is best for us. This is really empowering because it celebrates your uniqueness and gives you a path to becoming the best, most-healthy, joyful and empowered “you” that you can be. The TCM Five Element Theory is the basis of understanding the qualities of energy and how they interact in your life. There are many great books that can help you discover which Element (Water, Metal, Fire, Wood, Earth) you have an affinity to. All foods are related to a certain classification in the Elements, which helps you design a diet that is best for you throughout the various seasons. Each organ in your body is also associated with an element, and you can work with a professional to eat foods and herbs that will help strengthen specific organs and heal you in the most natural and ancient ways.

The group study trips that I lead to China and Thailand each year have enabled people to become immerse in this way of living and learn about how to incorporate the healing processes of diet, Qigong, meditation and energy work into their lives. My newest group study and healing trip to Thailand actually will create a meal plan and healing program for each person based on their individual Element and personality type.

Our personal challenge is to know what is “right” for our body and spirit. Many people… even those with major health/emotional problems… can identify what they need to change in their lives to get better. Sure, getting help from a medical/spiritual/psychological professional can help to refine the path, but we all know basically what we could do to improve our well being. The question is whether we can be honest with ourselves and then courageous enough to make the changes and break unhealthy patterns.

The `aina – the earth energy – provides us with so much, especially here in Hawai`i. The land is fertile, the water is pure, the weather is magical. The spirit energy is also a gift, ancient and powerful. Still, we need to find the quiet within us to accept what is being offered. If we put our focus on problems, limitations, and emotions, then that is what our lives will take on. Just like food, what we “take in” creates what we experience. Taking time for quiet meditation – even a few minutes every day – can help you reduce stress and return to your natural balance. Your mediation may be a walk along the beach, or sitting quietly next to a creek. It may be a visit to a heiau that calls you, or it may be to just close your eyes in quiet when you are alone. This is the time to breathe deeply and follow your breath. This is a time to give thanks for all the good things in your life, even when you feel you have to search hard to find them. This is the time to decide to take positive steps in your diet that will lead you to good health and personal empowerment. This is the time to remind yourself that you can choose to make any change you wish because everything is possible.

Francesco Garri Garripoli is the chairman of the Kaua’i Health and Wellness Association and founder of the non-profit Kahuna Valley organization (www.KahunaValley.org) that works to empower youth and families on Kaua’i. You can learn more about his books, Qigong DVDs, and group study trips to China and Thailand at www.WujiProductions.com.

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